39 Replies to “96 Free Professional Blog Topics”

  1. Just as we add “in bed” (or for the kids, “in school” – yeah, I do that) to fortune cookie fortunes, I think nit is important for any vblogger to add “and what it means to (my business, passion cause, etc)” to each of these topics.

    The larger point is, any topic suggestions are great, but in the end it is still work to make content that really matters.

    But you knew that

    1. Yup, good point. Thus the opening line to the fourth paragraph: “Only you know your specific business.” Any generic topic is somewhat destined to fail because it isn’t tailored enough. I hope by phrasing the topics as question, they at least invoke individuals to come closer to their actual work.

  2. Geoff,

    Free topic ideas in a world where some people think they have monetary value? You’re a mad man, especially since not one of these ideas contain a single fill in the blank.

    On a more serious note, this also demonstrates there is a difference between offering something of value vs. pretending to offer something of value.

    All my best,
    Rich

    1. Well, my video watching capability was taken out by the snow storm last night so I had to do something. It took my 3 hours+, almost twice as long as a normal blog post. Hard to believe people — albeit a just a very small few — are paying $120 a year for this. Well, at least there’s another alternate.

      1. I think your comment explains exactly why people would pay $10 a month (or whatever it is) for blog topics. You say it took you 3+ hours to come up with this list of topics. My guess is if a blogging exec (for example) was going to come up with a list of 96 post topics, that it would take them at least twice as long.

        So that means an executive can either spend 6+ hours figuring out blog topics for the rest of the year, or they can pay a guy $120 to do it for them. On paper, the idea makes perfect business sense and content creation ideas are a big sticking point for a lot of blogging companies. I can definitely understand why there is a market for this.

        1. Actually, Mack, I really object to that comment. Teach people to think so they can develop their own ideas and innovate, regardless of whether it’s a blog or simply product marketing. It’s unacceptable to me that leaders like you cosign this type of service.

          1. Geoff I never said it was the best use of their money, but I do understand the market for a service like this.

          2. Fair enough. I definitely have my point of view on this, but realize that money spent is an individual person’s prerogative. Thank you for coming back and clarifying, sir!

    1. You might win a free copy of my next book. Yay. Really, I can see the excitement from here. Really I can.

    2. Only if you answer all 96 in the same blog article, and if you can write it inside of 6 hours — slightly longer than the time given for a graduate degree final exam.

  3. Insert Easy Button here. Love that this gets back to the whole concept of giving things away for free to better your community.

    If I could write catchy jingles, I would have a real men of genius one for you.

    1. Wait. Wait one damn minute. You mean social media is meant to have conversations and help each other? Oh. My. God!

      1. I doubt they’d do it willingly but perhaps a few hours on “The Rack” might persuade them otherwise…

  4. Geoff, I’m enjoying the self-deprecating snark along with the undertones of actual help through thought for bloggers. On the surface, I appreciate (and will sharing as a bookmark) the inspiration as starting point. But I see your deeper meaning. (I know, peeking behind the curtain might make one go blind.)

    In all seriousness, thanks for this portion of the larger conversation.

    – Richie

  5. On a side note, Geoff, noticed some of the Flickr photos are yours and some are others. The first one has an ‘all rights reserved’ statement; had you requested permission, I wonder?

    1. In the new Flickr, the share option adheres to creative commons licensing. The photographer has All Rights reserved, he has been given full attribution according to the rules and licensing structure he selected in Flickr. If he does not want his photos shared, he can select a more rigid version of intellectual property protection, and Flickr will not give me the HTML code.

      1. I didn’t know that. So, when running an advanced search for creative commons-licensed photos that are OK to adapt upon, for instance, if a photo is marked ‘all rights reserved,’ it might appear? That’s the part that confuses me.

        I do like your above article, btw; I added it to my google reader share.

        1. There are photos I have tried to use with more rigid IP protection, and it will not give me the code. I like the new Flickr because this sharing option (or lack there of) saves me a ton of time from figuring it out. I will say that I still provide an extra link with author credit anyway just because I don’t want to get in trouble. :)

  6. I’m late to the discussion but kudos to calling attention to the paid “blog topic” services. Confirms my suspicion that people can’t think for themselves. (Hmm, how to they blog then? :-) )

  7. Excellent list indeed. Here are some more contributions:

    When should you exit a market?
    How does one win over an unreasonable boss?
    The trials and tribulations of an entrepreneur.
    How to truly “make their day”?

  8. Amazing write-up! This could aid plenty of people find out more about this particular issue. Are you keen to integrate video clips coupled with these? It would absolutely help out. Your conclusion was spot on and thanks to you; I probably won’t have to describe everything to my pals. I can simply direct them here!

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