Does a Social Score Make a CMO?

A recent infographic published on a Forbes blog ranks the top 20 Fortune 100 CMOs based on social scoring. The graphic poses an interesting question: Should CMOs be judged by their individual social media prowess?

The methodology for the social scores released in the infographic was not released, and there was an incredibly wide disparity between follower counts and placement in the Top 20. It’s hard to consider the scores valid because we don’t know the criteria used for the algorithm.

One would hope Forbes would insist authors provide information sources and research criteria, even when it’s published under the guise of a blog. More on this tomorrow. Today let’s address the question of CMOs and social media scores.

Clearly influencers have become an important part of marketing.

The first group of people to tell you that is the influencer/social media community. That’s because we as a group overvalue ourselves.

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Move Mountains – The Power of the Anti-Hero

The above video is my TEDx PeachTree speech (below is the written form) on how any of us can be make change happen in our lives.

I wanted to empower the audience with lessons learned about influence through my grassroots social change efforts.

Most importantly, any of us can create change. We don’t need heroes to save us.

We can choose to become influential in our core networks, and change our worlds.
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Why Klout and Kred Fail

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Image by Continuum

Last Friday, I spoke at TEDx Peachtree about how any of us can become influential and affect change in our world (you can read my speech here).

The speech took to task social scoring technologies Klout and Kred for failing to predict influencers and movements as they arise.

Attention — and more specifically public recognition of influence — almost always occurs after the fact. Someone who achieves a high Klout score for something notable already created that act.

That does not mean they will repeat their successes and inspire widespread action over and over again.
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Speaking at TEDx Peachtree: Become the Vessel

Towed Out to Sea

A few weeks ago, I blogged about needing to make ideas more palatable.

Well, this afternoon I have an opportunity to strut my stuff at TEDxPeachtree. I’ll be speaking about how we don’t need heroes, and that anyone can use influence to affect societal change (you can watch via livestream at 3:05 this afternoon).

I have been preparing this speech for months now. With good reason… More than 5000 people are expected to watch the event in person and via livestream.

LiveYourTalk Founder and Speaking Coach Jill Foster has been working with me to maximize this opportunity.
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LinkedIn Endorsements: Does It Get Any Cheaper?

LinkedInEndorsements

Retweets, Likes, +1s, +Ks, repins, and now LinkedIn Endorsements. Which one is cheapest?

At first given LinkedIn’s credibility as a professional social network, one would think Likes, +Ks and retweets (see my TweetEsteem issues) would be lesser forms of social currency.

But as you dive deeper into LinkedIn Endorsements you see how easily they can be given without thought or consideration.
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Coping with the Klout Reality

Lost
Image by cintamamat

Marketers and individuals will have to deal with social scoring in the form of Klout and its sister technologies.

As time progresses, technologies and alliances evolve. I haven’t written about Klout outside of general discussions on social scoring for a good long while.

There wasn’t much to say. I agreed in principal with many of my colleagues and their continuing coverage about the broken nature of influence metrics.

But I had a second reason: As a professional communicator, it’s become increasingly clear that we won’t escape Klout, Kred and PeerIndex.

The business marketplace cannot help itself. It will chase quick fixes to community building, recruitment and measuring individual online capabilities, making social scoring an obvious play. I have three reasons for coming to this conclusion.
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