Archive for the ‘Influence’ Category

Reliving Intellectual Flaws with A-List Influence

Posted on: July 30th, 2012 by Geoff Livingston 13 Comments

One last silhouette
Image via Flickr

“The ignorance, prejudices, and groupthink of an educated elite are still ignorance, prejudice and groupthink,” Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell’s Intellectuals and Society goes into great detail about the flaws intellectuals bring to bear upon society with their influence. Some of the behavior of A-Listers matches those of intellectuals, historically.

First, let’s use Sowell’s definition of intellectual, an occupational category — writers, academics and the like — whose works begin and end with ideas. Clearly this description matches bloggers who make their living based off their writing, via consulting, speaking and other services.

You might not like what they have to say, but you can’t deny the influence of A-List bloggers.
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Influence: The Importance of Consistency

Posted on: July 23rd, 2012 by Geoff Livingston 13 Comments

Consistency: a Motivational Poster
Image by jot777stan

It’s funny how much we talk about content frequency, retweet ratios, comments, etc. as key determinants of influence. What really matters in interactions with people, particularly as a content creator, is consistency.

Not that content, retweets and interactions aren’t important. They are (depending on your goals).

They’re just public and measurable, making them easily quantified. Go Klout.

From a psychological perspective, when trying to develop influence and loyalty we need consistency in those acts. We trust people that deliver reliable consistent acts, and are even lulled into trusting them without thinking about it (groupthink).
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Creativity Finds Its Genesis Alone

Posted on: July 16th, 2012 by Geoff Livingston 11 Comments

alone.
Image by Camila Dal-Ri Brugnera

Society values collaboration and groupthink in our decision making and increasingly attention-based popularity driven social web, but a collaborative culture repels creativity. We are not good for me (at least from a creative standpoint).

A study from Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist shows that the most creative minds are introverted, they need quiet and alone time to prosper.

In essence, new directions aren’t necessarily crowdsourced. An idea starts somewhere, and usually that’s with an individual.
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