The Photographer’s Choice: Favorite and Unpublished #FYPx Shots

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FYPx Influencers from Left to Right Mario Villaneuva, Victoria Ramos, Victoria Gonzales, Edgar Woo, Juan Flores, Jacob Fu, Faith Eve Bee, and Erin McGrady.

Last September, I had the great pleasure of serving the National Park Foundation as a volunteer photographer for its Find Your Park Expedition (#FYPx) 2016. The trip featured eight super Instagram influencers, and fantastic National Parks and Historic Sites, including Yosemite National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Alcatraz Island, Rosie the Riveter WII Home Front National Historic Park, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park, and John Muir National Historic Site. It was an incredible way to be of service, especially during the National Park Service’s 100 year anniversary!

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F Market Castro

My friend Joe Newman interviewed me about the assignment and what I thought of it. It was incredible to work with these influencers, and as I told Joe, “‘The National Park Service can tell you how awesome their parks are, and it sounds interesting. But when you witness this through a friend or a trusted contact’s online media, well now you are a believer.”

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Mandatory Ranger Pointing Pic

I have published some pics that would be most popular online, but not necessarily my favorite ones. So I thought I would add to the narrative by choosing my favorite pictures, particularly ones I have yet to publish. There are a few familiar ones, but generally these are brand new or have been seen in only one of my networks rather than across all of my properties.

So with that, let’s go! And if you want Yosemite shots, just scroll to the end.

Golden Gate Recreation Area (Including REI Bike Tour)

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Golden Gate at Sunset (probably my best shot of the trip)

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Hang Time

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Walking a Thin Line

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The Underbelly

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Super Tanker

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Hiding in the Shade

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Palace of Fine Arts

 

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Scale

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Admiring the Architecture

Alcatraz

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Boat to Alcatraz

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Tunnel Under Alcatraz

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Sadness

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Cell Block

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Prison Factory

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Ranger Walking

San Francisco Maritime

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Tugboat

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To the Deck

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Crates

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Engine

Rosie the Riveter

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Rosie

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A Surviving Rosie

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Rosie the Silhouette

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Rosie, the Facility

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94-year old ranger Betty Reid Soskin

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The View from Richmond

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Photobombing

Yosemite

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El Capitan

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Half Dome

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Inspired

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Vernal Falls

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Four Mile Trail

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A Place to Breath

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Yosemite Valley

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Channeling Ansel

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The Majestic Lodge

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Walking Amongst Giants

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The Mist Trail

 

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Playing Amongst the Stars.

A Photographic Adventure

We’re en route to the Big Island in Hawaii. It’s our tenth anniversary trip, truly a remarkable achievement. We made it.

When we were dating, I told Caitlin, “I’ll take you to Hawaii, babe.” Finally, that foolish boy’s promise has become a reality. I’m very excited for her to enjoy Hawaii, a place I have visited twice with great delight. And Soleil is with us, too, as she is only four and too young for a two-week visit with the grandparents.

Like all families we have our own interests. Caitlin wants to snorkel. I want to photograph the volcanoes and the Milky Way from atop Mauna Loa. Soleil wants to go whale watching, which I understand you can do from the beach (we’re not putting her on a boat).

How can I use this trip to create exceptional photos, some of my best yet? Let’s make it a photographic adventure instead of the usual Joe Tourist holiday and Facebook album. So how does one do that?

Gear

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First of all, I don’t own ideal equipment. Some of the lenses and my Nikon Df are very good, but there are some weaknesses. The good news is I have some help. My friend Philip Robertson connected me with the folks at LensRentals, who sported me a rig for the trip (I have not been paid, just given free equipment). Here is what they sent me:

  • Nikon D810
  • Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 ED
  • Zeiss ZF.2 50mm f/1.4
  • Nikon 85mm f/1.4G AF-S
  • Nikon 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED

The two telescopic lenses and the Zeiss 50 mm lens are superior to anything I own. They will produce exceptional images (provided I frame them and use the camera correctly). In addition, I needed the telescopic lens for my helicopter excursion over the volcanoes.

The 85 mm lens is more of a test for me. I own the less expensive 1.8f Nikon lens, and have always wanted to see what the difference was. I hope to put this to test in some low light situations, and see how the lens performs.

The D810 camera is a 36 megapixel beast. I have rented its predecessor, the Nikon D800, and opted to buy the Df instead. I liked the sensor a little more on the retro camera.

But as time progressed and my craft evolved, I came to appreciate the need for a faster, more versatile camera. Having a quicker shutter speed, better low light focusing, and sharper images would help in a wide variety of scenarios.

Many pros who shoot with Nikon equipment have told me the D810 is the best bang for the buck. I am considering the D810 as a potential next camera. Now I get to test it in a real scenario. Thank you, LensRentals.com for the opportunity to check all of this fine equipment out.

Commitment to Quality

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The other trick is to commit to quality. It would be really easy to walk around all day and shoot, and load a ton of images to Facebook. I don’t think that’s ideal, for you or for me.

What I’d rather do is post one great photo a day, the best of the best. That means 1) editing one photo a day, which can take 15-45 minutes based on my current workflow. The rest can wait until I get back.

And 2) I’d rather be intentional, setting aside certain times for photography, and spending the rest with my family. I know the gold and blue hours (one hour before and after the sunrise and sunset, respectively) are the best times to shoot. I intend to make the most of them.

Last, or 3) when I do shoot during the day it will likely be with the 50 mm or the 85 mm unless I am in the volcano shooting or whale-watching. I plan on daytripping with a lighter entourage. Then when I take a photo it will be to record a remarkable scene, not just because I happen upon a macadamia farm or there is a turtle on the beach. Unless of course that turtle is remarkable.

Most importantly, while I intend to take great pics, I’m most focused on having fun. After all, it is a vacation, and a special one at that.

You can see the pic a day on the 365FullFrame website, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or on Google+. I also intend to start a Pinterest board. If I do happen to post more than one photo a day, it will only be on Flickr.

Let’s see where this goes! Mahalo.

Can Flickr Catch Instagram?

Flickr celebrated 10 years of serving photos earlier this month, making it an old man amongst social networks. But the photo network is still relevant today, ranking in the top 10 social networks thanks to a resurgence under Marissa Mayer’s watch. In fact, Flickr is now ranked just one spot behind rival photo network Instagram.

In the past two years, Yahoo! redesigned the site to give it a modern feel, added new apps, gave photographers a massive amount of free space (one terabyte), and continues to evolve its feature set. Most recently, Flickr added Creations, an easy way for photographers to create their own Photo Books. The series of changes has produced a visual renaissance.

Flickr has 92 million users now, from amateur to the most professional of photgraphers. Unlike Instagram, Flickr’s robust copyright protection mechanisms provides more experienced photgraphers a safe place to post, in turn attracting higher quality images.

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Image by antony5112 on Flickr.

While Instagram may be the place for casual photo sharing and in-the-moment visual hashtagged memes, Flickr offers a search beast and credibility. Google, Bing and Yahoo alike index the site, and offer its images in their results. Tagging drives additional native search traffic, too. As a result, Flickr is a top resource for those looking for creative photos.

In my opinion, Yahoo!’s Flickr may overtake Facebook’s Instagram as the number one photography social network. What a coup that would be for Marissa Mayer.

I post on both Flickr and Instagram, and I can safely say that I have never had an Instagram photo featured in a news story, book, or on Getty Images. My works on Flickr have been featured in three books, twelve were licensed by Getty Images, and hundreds have been featured in blogs around the world.

In fact, Flickr is so powerful that my photo blog regularly outperforms this blog every month. I am expecting my one millionth photo view (none of which include me) early this Spring, outpacing this blog’s page views (which includes the old Now Is Gone blog, launched at roughly the same time as my Flickr blog, but not the Buzz Bin from 2006-9).

The combination of better apps and features, higher visibility to influential photography users, and increased social function gives Flickr the edge over Instagram in my book. What do you think?

Featured image by me, shot in Philadelphia this past Saturday.