Posts Tagged ‘infographic’

Marketing in the Round Infographic: The Tip of the Iceberg

Posted on: May 14th, 2012 by Geoff Livingston 4 Comments

Marketing in the Round Infographic

Today, Gini Dietrich and I launch Marketing in the Round in Chicago with a virtual (1 ET) U-Stream book bomb and a live (5 CT) networking event! Read Gini’s post here about how the book happened.

Immersed in the era of visual media, what better way to start the day than with an infographic of statistics used in the book (also available directly on Flickr and Scribd). The RAD Campaign designed infographic demonstrates how today’s online marketing conversation, actual business expenditures, and business selection of tactics are not in synch.

(more…)

The State of Influencer Theory Infographic

Posted on: July 15th, 2011 by Geoff Livingston 18 Comments

The State of Influencer Theory

The above infographic — “The State of Influencer Theory” (download here) — was published today as part of a primer on influence theory that appeared in SmartBrief on Social Media. The post updates a section of Welcome to the Fifth Estate to include leaderboard theory, such as Klout and Empire Avenue.

Addressing some issues pointed out in “Infographics: Art or Porn,” this graphic is designed by Jess3 (thank you, Jesse and Leslie), the industry leader in online data visualization. The infographic fits on one screen view. Because the graphic depicts people and theories, it is designed as a fun, cartoonesque map that illustrates the evolution of theory, creating a pop art element to it. The downloadable graphic is licensed as Creative Commons (with attribution), is high resolution, and can be made into a poster or screen wallpaper.

The key for the data elements in the graphic can be found in the companion post and is listed below:

The Tipping Point (2000) by Malcolm Gladwell – Movements are caused by three types of influencers; connectors, mavens (subject matter experts) and salesmen. Examples: Old Spice Guy, Dell Listens.

Six Degrees/Weak Ties (2003) by Duncan Watts — Data analysis shows influencers rarely start contagious movements, instead average citizens provide the spark. Examples: Egyptian Revolution, Tumblr – Digg Events.

One Percenters (2006) Jackie Huba & Ben McConnell – It is the content creators amongst Internet communities that drive online conversations. Examples: Lady Gaga, Ford Vista.

The Magic Middle (2006) by David Sifry: The middle tier of content creators and voices break stories and discussing that trickle up into widespread contagious events. Examples: 2008 Obama Election, Motrin Moms.

The Groundswell (2008) by Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff: Movements start within communities, and leaders rise up out of the community, and can have many roles including content creator, critic and collector. Examples: Haiti Earthquake Texting, Pepsi Refresh.

Trust Agents (2009) by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith – Influencers are people who build online trust and relationships whose communities look to them for advice and direction. Examples: Gary Vaynerchuk (WineLibrary.TV), Republican Party’s #FirePelosi Campaign.

Free Agents (2010) by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine – These trusted influencers are independent of traditional command and control organizations, and crash into the walls of storied cultures. Examples: @BPGlobalPR, Robert Scoble at Microsoft – Channel 8

Leaderboards (2010-11): Influence can be quantified by online actions taken by a person’s community, including retweets, mentions, comments and more. Examples: Klout, Empire Avenue.

Because the article is meant to serve as an objective primer on well-discussed theories, there’s little opinion about which theories work and don’t. You do see some alignment in the graphic of top down versus bottom up theories, as well as the basic offsetting of these two theory families, with Gladwell and Watts taking opposite sides. However, there is much to say from an opinion standpoint, and it will be said here next week. :)

Infographics: Art or Porn?

Posted on: May 25th, 2011 by Geoff Livingston 40 Comments

InfoGraphicGraphicInfo
Infographic by Isaac Pigott

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. They convey stories in ways complex narrative content. When people try to shove 10,000 words into one infographic, pictures create headaches. And so we have the debate of whether most infographics are well-designed art or cheap info porn.

What used to be a clever art form from the likes of USA Today and the Onion (hat tip: Brian Blank) has now become the social web’s equivalent of media snacks. But Pop Chips are not hors d’ouvres as we have learned, and these infographics have become painful in length and the amount of complex data they try to convey.

Some require three, four or more screen views to convey all of their data. Others have so much information packed into the single screen view that you need reading glasses to read the fonts. These types of infographics would make any art director worth their salt scream. David Ogilvy would roll over in his grave if he could see these monstrosities. Is this too harsh? No. It’s the equivalent of admiring a beautiful painting depicting a woman versus watching cheap porn.

Yet more and more infographics are created because, frankly, they fascinate the eye attracting readers where simple text leaves content producers wanting. Complex infographics are the bad accidents of online media, sending in droves of online rubberneckers and fostering new inbound links.

Aston
Jon Aston hates infographics (Image by Devin Matthias)

That’s not to throw out the baby with the bathwater. A simple, well designed infographic can still tell an incredible story. But these types of infographics are harder and rarer to find. As Chip Heath said, “Simple is not easy.” Make sure the infographics you use are well-designed, convey information concisely and are actually useful.

What do you think of the infographic craze? Do you love them or hate them?