5 Ways to Reverse Mentor Millennials

It’s no secret that youth are usually the first demographic to embrace new technologies and media. Older communicators often struggle with changing tools, causing them to hire younger staff to engage with these tools.

As time has progressed social and mobile media have become critical components of the modern marketing mix. In turn, Generation X and Baby Boomer marketing and PR pros have been forced to embrace new media. Learning these tools can be difficult, but co-workers — yes, the very same junior staff hired to “handle” social media — can help.

Be smart about this. One primary characteristic of millennial generation is a desire to be included and treated respectfully. Young co-workers want access to executives, and choose work environments where they can build something together.

Embracing them fulfills these needs while helping your older staff adjust. In addition, youth are missing the value experience brings. Reverse mentoring leverages both work groups strengths, and cross pollinates them.

Here are five reverse mentoring techniques to empower young staff members to help their co-workers learn next generation media tools:

1) Build Technology or Media Task Forces

We know how important technology and media are becoming to businesses. Build a task force charged with leading the company into the future. Populate it with a healthy mix of youth, communications team members and appropriate senior executives. Make sure your committee has a clear mission and structure to achieve your business outcomes.

2) Give Millennials Progressive Roles

Do more than put millennials on the committee. While it’s a great first step, you may want to assign leadership roles to those that demonstrate initiative.

Group chair, lead social media trainer, corporate ambassador to local tech/social events, etc. are all great ways to empower millennials with positions of worth in the company. Make sure you mentor first timers so they can succeed in these roles. Professionalism and leadership skills cannot be assumed.

3) Provide Reverse Training Opportunities

If you have an organization of twenty or more, it’s likely that members from the entire company are struggling with new media. Create training opportunities across the company, and have your younger team lead them. Show them how to coach others and build great presentations, perhaps even provide them speaker training.

4) Offer Access to Executives

Executives need to know how technology is changing the way customers interact with brands. Millennials want access to leadership. You can fulfill both stakeholder groups by allowing your Task Force members to brief the executive team on its findings. Or invite executives to the committee so they can ask and answer questions. This doesn’t have to be an every week occurrence, but do it periodically so both groups benefit from each other.

5) Social and UX Roles

Another way to embrace younger team members’ familiarity and knowledge with technology is to let them take lead roles in relevant work areas. For example, let millennials manage social communities, provide feedback on the online user experience, and make technology suggestions for corporate IT.

Like the other steps, be proactive and mentor your younger team members. For example, don’t leave the team out on the social web without immediate access to more seasoned senior executives who can handle an online crisis or customer service issues.

What reverse mentoring tips would you add?

This post ran originally on the Vocus blog. Featured image by ITUPictures. I am on vacation until September 30 and will not be commenting. The floor is yours!

Applying Social Storytelling to Strategic Online Fundraising

Donors

This is a preview of tomorrow’s Millennial Donors Summit presentation on “Connecting with Social Media” at 11:30. There is still time to register for the telesummit! Join us!

The fundamental skill of social is applying traditional relationship development savoir faire in the media. Meaning, the tools are the tools, but the actual interaction between people should be the focus for those seeking to cultivate donors. Your communication must convey a compelling story and a means for the donor to participate.

From this year’s Millennial Donors report: “Like last year, millennials said they gave most often as a result of personal, traditional giving requests, with popular technologies such as online and email giving coming in at lower percentages. However, the respondents also suggested that they prefer to give primarily through online tools. The message here? They might give more often through personal asks because many organizations have not caught up with technological giving options.”

Here’s another juicy tidbit: “65% want to know how [their dollars] makes a difference.” Further, “84% of millennials said they are most likely to donate when they fully trust an organization, and 90% said they would stop giving if they do not trust an organization.”

Trust is the basic currency of human relationships, and online is no different. Most are worried on how to rock Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Tumblr and other tools. Technical proficiency is important, but it comes with practice over a period of weeks. Ironically, the most common mistake nonprofits make with social is to treat it like another medium, and simply publish solicitations and marketing.

Instead focus on how to interact with people and compel them to 1) believe in you and your cause; 2) invest in you (via donation, advocacy or other means); and 3) sustain that relationship so that it has a chance to be more than a transaction. Understanding how your community interacts online will determine the tools. How you use the tools is the issue.

Connecting with Millennial Donors via Social Media

This requires compelling storytelling and interactions within social. As the study says, 85% of millennials pointed to a compelling mission or cause as the primary reason for donating. The report offers some additional insights on how to cultivate trust: “1. Friends or family endorsement 2. Report financial condition 3. Opportunities to meet leadership.” These are intrinsic elements to good storytelling for content and interactions. But there is more.

Compelling storytelling requires a a few story elements. A recent phone conversation with Network for Good’s Katya Andresen crystallized the fundraising “perfect storm:” An authentic tie between the person asking for the donation and the cause; a truly engaged community; and an impassioned ask as opposed to a posted request.

The authenticity angle is critical. You can’t just ask someone to give based on stats and the nonprofit’s mission. Instead, show people why you care, why it is important to you, and why you believe they should care. How has this issue impacted your life? As a nonprofit find a person to tell this story as opposed to communicating from the ivory tower.

With the community, this is the basic blocking and tackling of social. You can’t turn the lights on and simply ask for money. Participation and interaction for months and years prior to fundraising creates a strong community, one that is tied to the personality or organization. When relationships are in place — a result of mutual investment of time and value — the community responds.

Lastly, you can’t just drop a link and ask people to donate. Make it a drive, a series of compelling asks. Show them ways to donate and participate. Try to make them feel like heroes, and their donations are making a difference. Keep them updated on the drive.

As noted in the report, a critical aspect is to sustain the relationship after the donation. Donors want to be informed about how their investment made an impact. These people believed in you, now tell them what you are doing with their investment. One more statistic from the study to back this up: 79% of donors want continued outreach to include updates on programs and services.

Case studies will be included in the Milliennial Donors Summit presentation. A follow up to the Summit will be posted on the Inspiring Generosity blog.