Going Back to Mirrors

Last weekend at #NatsFest, my Olympus PEN-3 died an honorable death. It served me well through two years of toddler-dom. The photos in this post are the last ones I took with it.

In its stead, I decided to go back to the traditional DSLR camera with mirrors. So my new Nikon D7100 arrives today in the mail at some point. I had owned one of its predecessors, the D90, through 2011.

As much as I liked the compact nature of the Olympus body, and the sharp micro 4/3 picture, it just wasn’t the same. I had a much harder time manipulating light with the manual settings. As a result, while the PEN-3 took sharp photos they just never felt completely natural to me.

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I hear newer editions of the micro 4/3 camera have evolved significantly, but in the end I decided to give the technology some more time to mature.

It was not a cut and dry choice. I almost got a Nikon D610, but elected to hold back on the full frame format for now. If I grow Tenacity5 to ten employees, that will be my reward.

So here’s to a new vessel for wonderful pictures. What do you shoot with?

Social Photography: Thoughts and 4 Tips

Ride the Sunset!
Taken mid-air last night with an iPhone 4s.

You may not love Flickr, Instagram or Pinterest, but you can’t deny the continuing rise of social photography. Photos dominate social media. Even on Facebook, the king of networks, people spend 17 percent of their time perusing photos according to a recent ComScore/BuddyMedia study.

Facebook time spent seg

Whether they are retail pics “pinned” on Pinterest, food shots discussed on any social site (25 percent of foodie photo creators do so as part of a daily food diary), or a happenstance shared on Instagram or via TwitPic, photos are a universal staple of the online social world. As such, social photography should be a part of your communications strategy.

The results have been fantastic for me. While this blog has a decent following, in the four years I have written here regularly (some of the old 2007-8 posts were imported from my now defunct Now Is Gone blog), my photo blog on Flickr has generated roughly 50% more page views.

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