So Long, Summer of 2014

It’s hard to believe, but this is the last week of unofficial summer. Labor Day is just one week away, and the official autmun grind begins.

Personally, I feel like the summer ended somewhere in July. Work has gotten very busy, unlike any summer in recent memory.

At the same time, I had some great experiences this summer, including watching Soleil sprout up even more and get taller. Here are five memories I won’t forget anytime soon:

Soleil, the Jaguar Girl

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There comes a point where your kid becomes much more sociable and fun. Soleil is becoming quite the young lady. She knows what she likes, including face paint, painting in general, all things pink, trains, horses, dinosaurs and just about any live animal. She even likes taking photos now, and will tell me to set up the camera so she can point and click. This “girl jaguar” face paint photo was taken at the Central Park Zoo.

New York, New York

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You never know where business is going to take you, and little did I know this summer would involve some significant travel to New York City. And I love New York, so the trips made me happy. Two thumbs up!

3) Rocking the Full Frame

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Part of my summer activity included fundraising for and launching my 365 Full Frame project with my new Nikon Df camera. This has been immensely fun, and I am learning a ton. Now I also am getting mentored by my new client Cade Martin. Heck, I even started shooting in studio last week.

4) Business Is Red Hot

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About mid-July we started winning what would be a string of four new clients and one new business partnership (to be announced soon). Tenacity5 went as long as we could without hiring, but it became apparent that we needed help, so Jessica Bates has agreed to join the company, and will manage several clients for the company.

In addition, I signed a book deal in mid August for my third novel (it will be a present day novel, not one from the Fundamentalists series). This will be released in early 2016.

5) OMG, the Nats Are Serious!

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I was at that heartbreaking Game 5 of the 2012 NLDS against the Cardinals. Ever since then the Nats have been a bad case of unfulfilled potential, that is until this summer. They have been red hot, and it has been great enjoying my partial ticket plan with my wife Caitlin, Soleil and friends. Playoffs here we come!

So those are my five big memories of The Summer of 2014. How about you? What will you remember most?

Introducing the 365 Full Frame Project

Many people have asked me in recent months how or if I was going to monetize my photos. Some have even asked to buy some (thank you for your interest!).

After thinking on the topic, I have decided not to proactively build a business around my photography. I like the artistic aspects of photography, and want to shoot as I see fit. So I will remain semi-pro, licensing via Getty Images and only selling photos to people who specifically ask me for them.

At the same time, I’ve come up with a cool way to give people access to my photo content and use the images in their own lives or work. I call it the 365 Full Frame project on Indiegogo, a social media experiment, if you would.

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My 365 Full Frame project seeks to fund the acquisition of a full frame camera to take and publish one high resolution image every day that could be used for a whole variety of purposes, from social media shares to print. My Nikon D7100 does a decent job, but with better tools I can deliver even stronger results for my colleagues. To get a full frame camera (D800) and the appropriate lenses, I need a minimum of $5,000. If more money is funded, then I will get a top of the line D4s camera.

This is an opportunity to own some or a whole group of 365 full-frame high quality photographs, taken by me. There are two packages for individuals and content creators alike. Funders will be able to access 365 high quality, full-frame photos published daily over a year.

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Specifically, funders will receive access to the photos on a limited or fully open basis depending on their commitment level. Higher level funders can request subjects so long as it does not require me to travel. All funders will receive recognition on the 365 Full Frame website when it is revealed. General subjects will include:

  • Travel sights as business permits (currently I have Silicon Valley, Big Sur, New York City, Cleveland, Philadelphia, and Hawaii planned)
  • Networking events
  • Washington, DC landscapes
  • Sunsets and sunrises
  • Select parent and pet photos

With the 365 Full Frame Project, people that want to buy my photography can do so in a cool way, and content creators can access the high quality photos they need to succeed. Me, I get a new toy to feed my photography hobby without necessitating the launch of a new business.

Please support the 365 Full Frame, a Visual Social Experiment today!

Business Resolutions for 2013

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A new year is upon us, and like many others I have a few resolutions for my business and online life.

In addition to discussing the environment more frequently, here are some of my goals:

Less Travel

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Last year was my worst travel year since 2009, doubling my normal road time. This travel was in large part to support Marketing in the Round. By my calculations, I traveled at least one day a week 60% of the year, and from March until December it was more than 80%.

The impact on my family and personal exhaustion was significant.

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7 Branded Experience Marketing Tips for Artists and Writers

The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Jimi Hendrix Image by jbhthescots

Music biz marketer Corey Biggs interviewed me five times for the book to help artists brand and market themselves.

Based on those interviews, I have accumulated several branded experience marketing tips.

While I have simply protested the personal brand movement in the past, it’s better to offer useful guidance to individuals. This is particularly true for artists and writers who often have no choice but to market creative products and ideas under their names.

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