7 Replies to “Why People Believe They’re Social Media Rock Stars”

  1. My husband calls me the blondest, friendliest nerd he’s ever met in his life. I just tried to copy and paste my homies’ blogs collaboration address and accidentally pasted the Alfred Hitchcock series I’m watching on Hulu. Keep on being real, Geoff. The best from me and Michael to you and yours,

  2. Thanks Geoff for the comment and extended comment. Also, I had never seen the movie, that is great.

    Although I can empathize with people’s need for attention and to feel like a rock-star (I mean, there is an entire genre of video games devoted to this psychosis), perhaps what I’m most annoyed with is the overuse of the term by marketing and social media types. Whether is is “rock star”, “guru” or “expert” it has now become to easy for folks to label themselves without merit.

    The examples I listed in my post were very purposeful since those two people accomplished great things, therefore they had the right to the moniker of rock star. They never put it on themselves, it was just a result of great and sustained work. I’m all for positioning someone as a rock star, but only when their accomplishments outweigh their talk.

    Keep on rocking! ;)

    /kff

  3. There has been many, many uncomfortable shifts as a result of social media. I think this kind of nanofame, or desire to self proclaim nanofame is just one of many examples of our societal shift.

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