17 Replies to “5 Social Media Distractions”

  1. Two things first: 1) THAT FACE! OMG! I just want to kiss her a thousand times over and 2) Angry Birds rules, but if you have to play it more than one day, you seriously have issues.

    The only thing I don’t agree with here is your point on the AdAge listing. But we’ve discussed this before. Our prospects do pay attention to that, just like they pay attention to who PR Week and AdAge are talking about in the industry. We just won a big digital communication project from a Fortune 10 company because of our AdAge ranking, as compared to the two agencies we were competing against. Well, not solely, but it was a factor they took into consideration.

    As for the conferences, A-freaking-men! I’ve been saying this for years when people say, “Why don’t you go to such-and-such?” Because my prospects and clients aren’t there and, as much as I really would love to hang out with you and have a drink, I have limited time. So that time is going to be spent where I can be most effective in growing my business.

    1. Ha! Thanks. The ranking thing reminds me of PR awards, they pretty much matter to the person investing the time in them and no one else. Does it make for a credibility point? Sure. But I’ve never been ranked above the top 100 on the Ad Age 150 and I’ve gotten plenty of Fortune 500 and top tier nonprofit clients. So your point about it mattering to top clients is not true, in my experience.

      I have a friend in NYC, and she regularly gets invited to shoot-outs with some of the gentlemen in the top ten of this ranking She is not even ranked. She has 3000 Twitter followers. Guess who wins? Why? Because she has orchestrated so many winning campaigns for top brands her word of mouth referral network is to die for. Similarly, I have gotten almost every single on of these clients via reputation. Nothing beats what another brand says about you, including awards and rankings.

      1. We totally agree there and I think most of the top 10 are too busy worrying about their numbers than doing real client work. We compete with the big agencies, mostly because they’re in our backyard. It definitely gives us a leg up to be listed on AdAge. Hands down. An added bonus is it’s super fun to tease Danny about my coming close to beating him. But, in that sense, it has nothing to do with clients. :)

        1. Now I can see using a ranking as a way to throw salt in big agency wounds, er, weaknesses. Maybe I should up my ranking just to give the Canuck some grief. LOL!

    2. Ha! Thanks. The ranking thing reminds me of PR awards, they pretty much matter to the person investing the time in them and no one else. Does it make for a credibility point? Sure. But I’ve never been ranked above the top 100 on the Ad Age 150 and I’ve gotten plenty of Fortune 500 and top tier nonprofit clients. So your point about it mattering to top clients is not true, in my experience.

      I have a friend in NYC, and she regularly gets invited to shoot-outs with some of the gentlemen in the top ten of this ranking She is not even ranked. She has 3000 Twitter followers. Guess who wins? Why? Because she has orchestrated so many winning campaigns for top brands her word of mouth referral network is to die for. Similarly, I have gotten almost every single on of these clients via reputation. Nothing beats what another brand says about you, including awards and rankings.

  2. Geoff,

    Excellent, albeit rather elementary, observations. Putting first things first shouldn’t require a blog post but in today’s social media space, it’s oft forgotten. High Klout scores, tens of thousands of followers, and a RT from Chris Brogan have replaced self-improvement.

    Heck, we can all be guilty of any one of these 5 distractions (I often ask myself what the hell am I doing on twitter). But I think those people that have actually experienced real-world success in their career or business (or actually find a job and aren’t free to spend their whole day tweeting anymore) slowly begin to understand that social media is castles made of sand.

    Being a filmmaker and artist, social media has become an outlet for my film/video work and, more recently, my writing. It serves that purpose well. Ultimately, my livelihood is based on community involvement and referrals, not tweets.

    Nicely done.

  3. @twitter-1966141:disqus Just yesterday I was talking with a friend of mine about the relevancy of social media “scores”, rankings, and other industry credibility badges. Specifically I asked him if he thought they were necessary, especially in the face of actual results – hard core numbers. The conclusion we came to is that for the most part they are superfluous and unnecessary, if you can prove that you are getting actual results for your customers.

    Personally I’d rather focus on getting results, and I’m sure my clients would agree.

  4. Hi Geoff! Thought provoking post. I think all of us have different distractions. For me, Social Media is not where the thrust of my professional work is, so I have to be particularly careful about getting distracted from my distraction. It’s quite the brain pretzel.

    My opinion in regards to what to do about people you disagree with online is just to concentrate on your point of view. Get it out there. Whether it’s an A-lister or a person who just started blogging yesterday, spending time on them gives them the gift of attention, which is the last thing you want to do if you find their perspectives harmful.

    Not long ago, there was a post that seemed in subtle ways to attack most of what I’m doing online. I could have written an angry retort, left a hideously inappropriate comment, or tweeted that “so and so is really not as nice as I thought.” Rather, I wrote a couple of posts over the next week really emphasizing why I believed in the things that they were attacking. No links. No names. Just getting my thoughts out there. And you know what? My posts did better than that person’s did (not that I was counting).

    As for the other stuff, if your revenue is coming from Social Media activities, then you need to do what makes you money. It comes back to the perpetual misinterpretation of what ROI is. It’s not the followers or comments that create your ROI formula. It’s the money you make.

    And now I will stop writing a blog post here :)

    1. I like how you turned the other cheek, I, too, have taken to doing that more often, though if it is a light point of contention I will provide a link back (we used to be able to have conversations out here back in the day). But at which point do you simply ignore? It’s a tough question, a balancing act! Thank you for a great comment, Margie.

  5. I loved the line “T

    he more you talk about them positively or negatively, the more you increase their stature.” So true.

    Also the last point regarding biz conferences. The only success in being productive that I’ve managed to achieve is when you go there to interview people in order to create content for your site. The rest is pretty much one giant, big, fat piece of wasted turd pie :-)

    1. Like I said, some have produced client opportunities, but most of them, particularly the water cooler events are a big waste. I know you and others also feel the same way, so it is a collective experience!

  6. Geoff. SM is like a writing workshop. Take or accept that which is helpful and ignore the rest. SM has been the springboard for relationships, friendships, job opps, board appointments, blog posts etc. And now that I am facing the loss of my home in Aug, it is becoming a conduit for housing leads. Call it what you (universal) may but it’s enhanced not detracted from my life. And the beauty lies in the ability to press pause at any given moment.

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