What Big Data Tells You About Exodus

Being an egomaniac author with an inferiority complex, I commissioned a Helix Review to analyze Exodus against all published works within The Book Genome Project as well as making specific comparisons to titles in the science fiction genre. The big data mash-up tells you a ton about how your book works and your particular writing style.

bookstats

So the first thing you can tell is that Exodus is short! In spite of its length, it does have a healthy vocabulary for its length.  Sentence length is average. While classified as a science fiction book, it tends to have longer paragraphs than most books within the genre.

The review also analyzes the text for complexity, dialog and pacing.  To help compare the book, I suggested Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. Often classified as a science fiction book, The Handmaid’s Tale shares similarities with Exodus in that they are both dystopian future fiction books focusing on religious fundamentalism and oppression.

handmaid comparison

 

As you can see, in almost every category Exodus exceeds The Handmaid’s Tale. It has more action, complex language, dialog and descriptive text.  My book is slightly slower paced than Atwood’s. It fits within the norms of the genre except that it moves slower than and has more complex language than other science fiction books.

Story

The final piece of useful information I got from the book was the general elements that fit into the story DNA.  I have been focusing on the religious conflict, but Helix shows time, rivers (lots of rivers in Exodus), conflict, combat, pain, rocky terrain and history as critical underlying components in the book.

Then Helix shows you how these elements rank against the general book project and your genre.

genres

 

So all in all, you learn a lot about what you wrote, and  how your book fits within the larger context of the Book Genome Project. Now if the big data analysis could only tell you if the book was good!

What do you think of big data barometers like the Helix Review?

I am on vacation until September 30th and will not be responding to comments. The floor is yours!

17 Favorite Science Fiction Works

Image source: Aumanack Diversão sem limite

After reading last week’s post on science fiction, Erin Feldman asked me to suggest a few books in the genre. Of course, I was delighted. So here are my favorite science fiction books (and trilogies) of all time. You’ll see they span sub genre and era.

1) The Diamond Age (Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer) by Neal Stephenson. If you gave three young girls with different backgrounds a primer based on the the ultimate algorithm-based artificial intelligence, their lives would still end up completely different. And those with the most advantages may have the largest handicaps. Simply brilliant analysis of semantic technologies, and quite a dystopian look at nano-technology, too. Check it out.

2) Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan. Imagine if your soul could be backed up and stored in the cloud. You’d need a chip in your cordial stack to access motor functions, and to identify your soul if the physical body should fail. Assassins could forever wipe you from the face of the earth by destroying your cordial stack chip. This premise drives one of the most bloody and violent books in the cyberpunk genre. I loved it!

3) The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkein: Do I need to say anything about this cornerstone of fantasy and science fiction (the trilogy was originally one long book). I’ve read the stories of Middle Earth well over ten times in my life, and loved the movies, too. The compelling battle of good versus evil painted in a dire light still grips me every time.

Continue reading “17 Favorite Science Fiction Works”