2 Million and Counting

My Flickr blog passed 2 million views on Saturday. Thank you to everyone who checked out my stuff, chatted with me on Flickr, and encouraged me, too.

It took almost seven years to get my first million views. It took just 10 and a half months to get the second million.

16468477982_e2435e6930_k
The French Market in New Orleans.

What made the big difference? I can point to several things:

1) A commitment to quality content via the 365 Full Frame Project. I am continuing to shoot almost every day and develop my editing skills. But I think we know good or great content is not enough to succeed online these days.

2) Social interaction on Flickr and 500 Pixels has helped spread the reach of my photos. But it has done more than that. Interaction exposed me to so many good photographers, and I have learned a great deal from them.

16133720378_5a45054104_k
The Library of Congress

3) SEO: If you are not tagging photos on Flickr, shame on you. Both Google and Yahoo! index the site and offer the images as search results. If you offer a creative licensing option, people really do use them. I don’t have a Wikipedia page, but I sure as heck have quite a few photos on the site.

4) Luck: I’ve been blessed a few times and had a select few photographs like the above Library of Congress shot featured in Flickr’s daily Explore feature. Those moments exposed my photography to hundreds of new contacts. Because I engaged, they became a part of my network. For that, I am extremely grateful.

15823588964_91d3ea13cb_k (1)
The Boulevard of Bokeh Dreams (Nashville)

I never expected my photos would become this popular with others. For that I am grateful. More than anything, it makes me happy when I hear others tell me that the photos add a little to their social stream, that they look forward to seeing them.

Thank you. I hit two million, and but I am not looking back.

5 Common Forms of Facebook Spam

SPAM
Image by Christian Barmala

One of the issues a mature social network brings with it is spam. And though Facebook has rebooted its privacy settings for sharing, it is still largely an opt-out network that creates tons of spam.

The spamification of Facebook extends beyond professional solicitations to unwanted emails created by friends who want you to participate in their activities. While this is well-intended, it just shows that Facebook with its many features has also created many ways to spam your buddies. Here are five common forms of Facebook spam:

1) Group Additions

There’s nothing worse than getting added to a busy Facebook Group, and suddenly having dozens — even hundreds — of emails land in your in box. Worse, Facebook does not allow you to control notifications before getting added to a group. So you can only stop the spam after the fact. Ugh.

2) Event Invites

Yup, a marketer’s favorite, one that most of us are guilty of. But this feature has become meaningless to many power users because they receive so many unwanted event invites. Why bother?

3) Tagged with… Spam!

From professional photographers with watermarked images to marketers highlighting their wares, getting tagged with spam happens all the time. Of course, one man’s garbage is another’s treasure. If at all possible, when doing this, make sure the tagged post/picture/video includes them or is clearly of interest. You can avoid this kind of spam by barring people from tagging you via privacy settings.

4) Places

Oh, the mobile Places feature is going away… Only to be integrated across the entire network regardless of access method. Which means more Places spam. Beware of commenting or worse getting tagged by friends at a Place without having your privacy settings changed to avoid the deluge of email.

5) Friend Invites

These are just annoying. Businesses, obvious pornographers, anonymous handles, whatever. Regardless of motive, it’s downright obnoxious. And if you are conservative about your friending on Facebook, general friend requests from extended network members can be just as annoying. Friends aren’t what they used to be. Unless you say no ;)

What forms of Facebook spam do you find most, ahem, endearing? Applications? Notes? Learn more about Facebook’s Privacy Settings here.